Craigslist Joe!!!!

You know Craigslist. If you don’t, then you’ve been living under a rock for the past decade. Now you get to meet Craigslist Joe. But first… I was first introduced to Craigslist by my friend Pascale in 2003 and I thought it was the silliest idea. A free forum to advertise whatever. I thought it was weak because they only had a handful of cities. And it was free, who would ever use such a thing? and how could such a website exist and scale to be usable by the larger populace? At the time, they had a section for Los Angeles and San Diego but not Orange County.

Turns out that Craigslist wasn’t such a bad idea. They eventually added Orange County and now they have almost every major city and metropolitan area. If the past 17 years of growth aren’t proof of Craigslist’s amazing reach and power, then you now need to watch this documentary: Craigslist Joe.

Craigslist Joe is one of the coolest documentaries I’ve seen lately. You can find it on Netflix. Craigslist Joe is the story of Joseph Garner, a young man that decides to take a strange journey. Joe Garner decides to leave everything he knows behind for 30 day and live off of craigslist completely for those 30 days.

Joe kicks off his journey with a farewell party with his friends and family. To make the experience totally legit, he gets a new cell phone, and leaves all credit cards and access to friends behind. In his backpack, there is a toothbrush, and a few other basic items, his laptop and a portable hotspot.

I won’t spoil the fun of the film, but let’s just say that this guy will do in 30 days what you won’t do in years. From feeding the homeless and needy at a shelter, to learning how to break dance. The freedom of not having a job and putting all other responsibilities on hold lets Joe experience life as it comes. There are no expectations, no judgements, no failures.

Joe Garner on day 1 of his craigslist journey

Sir types a lot. The entire journey hinges on Joe posting and responding to ads.

Joe checking into craigslist to see what’s new.

Joe rides away on his bike, just before finding a ride to Portland

Joe and his new found ride to Portland.

Craigslist rideshare section seems to be a staple in Joe’s journey

Fran is an actress living in NY and met up with Joe.

Joe found a ride to New Orleans.

The rideshare section of Craigslist has all kinds of travelers looking for companionship.

Yes, Joe heads south of the Border for a quick detour.

Joe gets to chat with Craig Newmark from Craigslist about his 30 day experience

Joe hanging out at Craig’s house chatting about the experience.

Surprisingly, he’s able to go from California, all the way to New York and back. Throughout his journey, he finds food, company and shelter all through Craigslist and the generosity of its members. Truly a remarkable story and a really well made documentary. Towards the end, he even gets to meet the founder of Craigslist, Craig Newmark. Pretty cool adventure in my book.

I bet that Joe learned more about himself in these 30 days than many of us will learn about ourselves a year. In the closing part of the movie, Joe is asked to describe his experience in 10 words or less. He breaks down into tears as he tries to put into words what he has just experienced and at the end, the only thing he can say about the adventure is that it was inspiring. The most inspiring thing.

I am pretty picky about films, but this movie meets all three of my judging criteria (see #128). And turns out the executive producer is none other than Between Two Ferns funnyman Zach Galifianakis. Unlike most low-budget documentaries on Netflix, Craigslist Joe has a great soundtrack and the audio is clean, sharp and even. Sometimes indie movies and documentaries have a crappy audio track which ruins the whole experience. That’s not the case with this.

I would give this a two thumbs up and recommend you check it out. If you have seen it, what did you think about it?

Expert shit talker Donald Trump sues miss Pennsylvania !!!!

speaking at CPAC in Washington D.C. on Februar...

Donald Trump has succesfully sued former Miss Pennsylvania Sheena Monnin for defaming his Miss Universe pageant by claiming the whole contest was rigged. The case went to arbitration and a very fair-minded judge ordered Monnin to pay the totally reasonable sum of $5 million to Donald’s humble org. Just to put this amount into context, the average payout from the September 11th Fund was $1.8 million.

In a statement, Trump said, “We cannot allow a disgruntled contestant to make false and reckless statements which are damaging to the many people who have devoted their hearts and souls to the Miss Universe, Miss USA and Miss Teen USA pageant systems….While I feel very badly for Sheena, she did the wrong thing. She was really nasty, and we had no choice. It is an expensive lesson for her.”

Poor Trump. If anyone knows about defamation, it’s Donald, who dabbles in it almost daily. I’d like to do my own arbitration on some of Trump’s most egregious cases; just imagine me wearing a judicial robe while I dish out some fines.

Rosie O’Donnell vs. Trump:
Trump called O’Donnell “a fat pig” and “slob,” who is “disgusting — both inside and out.”
Fine: $100,000

Gloria Allred vs. Trump:
Trump offered to show her his penis and saying, “I think she’d be very impressed.” (I just threw up in my mouth.)
Fine: $200,000

Barack Obama vs. Trump:
Trump said, “I have a birth certificate. People have birth certificates. He doesn’t have a birth certificate. He may have one but there is something on that birth certificate — maybe religion, maybe it says he’s a Muslim, I don’t know. Maybe he doesn’t want that. Or, he may not have one,” and “I have a birth certificate. People have birth certificates. He doesn’t have a birth certificate. He may have one but there is something on that birth certificate — maybe religion, maybe it says he’s a Muslim, I don’t know. Maybe he doesn’t want that. Or, he may not have one.”
Fine: $500,000

The United States v Trump:
Trump tweeted on election night, “We can’t let this happen. We should march on Washington and stop this travesty,” and, “Our nation is totally divided! Lets fight like hell and stop this great and disgusting injustice! The world is laughing at us. This election is a total sham and a travesty. We are not a democracy!” And then:”Our country is now in serious and unprecedented trouble…like never before. Our nation is a once great nation divided! The electoral college is a disaster for a democracy.”
Fine: $1 million

“The Blacks” v Trump:
Trump claimed he’s “always had a good relationship with the blacks” (untrue on its face, given that he calls them “the blacks”).
Fine: $1.5 million

But Trump’s crimes aren’t limited to defamation. I order that Trump do community service and undergo counseling for saying the following about his daughter: “She does have a very nice figure. I’ve said if Ivanka weren’t my daughter, perhaps I’d be dating her.” Because that’s just creepy.

Reasons to see the hobbit!!!!

The Hobbit (2012 film)

The Hobbit (2012 film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Reasons To See The Hobbit For The Xth time.

1st time: It’s Peter Jackson and I loved The Lord of the Rings so this has to be good.

2nd time: I fell asleep because I went to the midnight screening. I have to see it a second time to make sure I understood the whole movie and didn’t miss something.

3rd time: I can’t really be sure that there isn’t some after-credits scene unless I’ve stayed in the theater until after the credits. I have to see it a third time.

4th and 5th time: How big a difference can there really be between forty-eight frames per second and twenty-four frames per second. The only way to know is to see both of them right after each other.

6th time: Verification for/contribution to http://www.moviemistakes.com

7th time: I could probably write a review of this thing. Would people read that? I’ll bring some paper and write down some thoughts.

8th time: Ugh, it’s too dark to write with pen on paper. new idea: LIVE TWEETING IT!

9-24th time: I won’t stop seeing this movie until I can name all thirteen of the dwarves by looking at a picture of their face.

25th time: Wow, I just closed my eyes for a second and my brain played the entire movie frame for frame. Surprisingly, it only played it in 24 fps version.

26th time: Haha brain, this isn’t funny anymore. Just because I’m in a dark room, it doesn’t mean that I’m seeing The Hobbit.

27th time: MAKE THE NIGHTMARE STOP!!

28th time: Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori……. Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,……Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,….Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,….Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,..Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,.Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,…Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,.. ARGH WHAT IS THE NAME OF THE 13th DWARF!! Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,..Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,..Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,….Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,……Fili, Kili, Oin, Gloin, Thorin Oakenshield, Dwalin, Balin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Dori, Nori,

29th: Ori, that’s right. This 3D effect is really nice.

30th: Wait, there’s going to be two more Hobbit movies?

Until next blog, watch the movie, me and my fiance did and it was great!

Paying for Facebook???

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...

Facebook Tests Payments to Send Messages

Facebook Inc. said Thursday it has begun testing a system for users to send messages to people outside their immediate circle of social contacts for a payment of one dollar, as the company continues to find new ways to capitalize on its popularity.

In a statement posted online, the Menlo Park, Calif.-based social site cited research showing that “imposing a financial cost on the sender may be the most effective way to discourage unwanted messages and facilitate delivery of messages that are relevant and useful.”

Facebook says the new test is designed to route messages sent from outside of a network of contacts around the lower-priority “Other” folder on a Facebook page, and directly into a user’s “Inbox“—for a small fee.

Each message sent will initially cost $1, though Facebook plans to continue tinkering with prices.

Facebook said the new message-routing feature will only be for personal messages between people in the U.S., and the maximum number that can be sent around someone’s Other folder to their Inbox per week is capped at one.

The latest move comes a few months after Facebook started testing a separate service that enabled users to pay $7 to make their personal posts more visible among contacts on the site.

Facebook, which has garnered one billion monthly active users, is also pursuing a number of online advertising and commerce initiatives as it seeks to bolster investor confidence.

After going public in May with its shares priced at $38, Facebook’s stock proceeded to dip below $20.

However, the shares have risen more than 20% in the past three months, and were trading at about $27.30 Thursday afternoon.

Being overweight

An obese topless man on a motorcycle. Original...

An obese topless man on a motorcycle. Original caption: “The plague of anorexia must be overcome” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Being Overweight Is Linked to Lower Risk of Mortality

The longest lived among us aren’t necessarily those who are of normal weight, says a new study.

According to new research this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers say that being overweight may lead to a longer life.

The somewhat surprising conclusion comes from an enormous, detailed review of over 100 previously published research papers connecting body weight and mortality risk among 2.88 million study participants living around the world. The new research confirms that obese people, and particularly those who are extremely obese, tend to die earlier than those of normal weight. But the findings also suggest that people who are overweight (but not obese) may live longer than people with clinically normal body weight.

The new report is the largest and most comprehensive review of how weight, measured as body mass index (BMI), a measure comparing the ratio of height to weight, can influence longevity. Previous studies that have exposed the link in the past, however, have raised questions about whether the overweight advantage is real.

“We published an article in 2005 that showed, among other things, that overweight was associated with lower mortality — and we got an awful lot of negative feedback from that,” says the current study’s lead author, Katherine Flegal, a senior research scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Since that study, however, dozens of others have reached the same conclusion — even if it was hard for researchers and the public to accept.

“I think there’s a lot of under reporting of this finding […] and so people are sort of repeatedly surprised by it,” Flegal says. Because many researchers don’t expect to find a benefit associated with being overweight, she suggests, they may not believe their results are valid if they find such a connection, which may make them more hesitant to publish them and invite review and discussion about what may be driving the trend.

For the new study, Flegal and her colleagues analyzed every study they could find that broke down death risk broken by the standard BMI categories set by the World Health Organization (WHO) in the late 1990s: with underweight defined as BMI less than 18.5, normal weight being BMI between 18.5 and 25, overweight being BMI between 25 and 30, and obese as BMI of over 30. Men or women who are 5’4″ would have “normal” BMI if they weighed between 108 and 145 pounds, for example, and overweight if they weighed 146 to 174 pounds.

Overall, people who were overweight but not obese were 6% less likely to die during the average study period than normal-weight people. That advantage held among both men and women, and did not appear to vary by age, smoking status, or region of the world. The study looked only at how long people lived, however, and not how healthy they were whey the died, or how they rated their quality of life.

Flegal and her co-authors suggest that it’s possible that overweight and obese people get better medical care, either because they show symptoms of disease earlier or because they’re screened more regularly for chronic diseases stemming from their weight, such as diabetes or heart problems. There is also some evidence that heavier people may have better survival during a medical emergencies such as infections or surgery; if you get pneumonia and lose 15 lbs, it helps to have 15 lbs to spare, for example.

Another possible explanation may involve “reverse causation”: maybe being thin doesn’t make you sick, as some experts argue, but instead being sick can make you thin. Being overweight may be associated with longer lives if people who lose weight because of diseases such as cancer, for example, contribute to earlier death among individuals who weigh less.

Flegal also says her findings may necessarily be contrary to previous studies about the relationship between BMI and mortality because those analyses used a variety of different BMI categories with different cut-points for the various weight groups. In the new JAMA study, Flegal and colleagues only looked at research using the WHO categories. Even so, she acknowledges that interpreting the results may be confusing, since the names of the WHO “normal” and “overweight” categories don’t necessarily correspond to commonly held perceptions. Today, roughly 33% of U.S. adults are clinically overweight, according to WHO standards, and an additional 36% are obese. By those standards, the average American is not clinically normal weight at all, but considered overweight. So in fact, the overweight people in the study who tend to live longest may not be fatter than most people at all. Among Americans, at least, they may actually be of average weight.

In addition, say doctors, weight alone may not be enough to understand an individual’s risk of developing disease and dying early. The latest research shows, for example, that it’s not just yjr fat that comes with weight gain, but the type of fat, particularly fat that accumulates around the belly, that might be more life-threatening. All of which suggests that the connection between weight and health is a complicated one that may not be measured simply in years lived

Researchers Take a Closer Look at Weight-Loss Surgeries
When It Comes to Longevity, It’s Not Years But Microlives that May Count
Study Suggests Lower Mortality Risk for People Deemed to Be Overweight…